- Get your daily doze of odd news and weird stories that relate to numbers.

46 per cent of couples disagree about online porn

Submitted by Dmitri Davydov on Mon, 2008-04-14 08:29.

Research undertaken at Oxford University suggests that an increasing number of people are spying on their partners online.

One in five couples admitted to reading a partner's emails or text messages, and 13 per cent examined their partner's internet browsing history. More than 2,400 individuals were questioned in the research.

Six per cent of the couples had met online, of which over a third had met at an internet dating site and 19 per cent in a chat room.

What job descriptions really mean

Submitted by Dmitri Davydov on Sun, 2008-04-13 11:38.

“Competitive Salary”
We remain competitive by paying you less than our competition.

“Join our fast-paced company”
We have no time to train you.

“Casual work atmosphere”
We don’t pay enough to expect that you will dress up; a couple of the real daring guys wear earrings.

“Some overtime required”
Some every night and some every weekend.

“Duties will vary”
Anyone in the office can boss you around.

Postal officials defend $13,500 steak dinner

Submitted by Dmitri Davydov on Sat, 2008-04-12 09:48.
Posted in:

WASHINGTON - When the U.S. Postal Service rang up a $13,500 tab at an Orlando steakhouse, it spared no expense during a five-hour meal that government investigators are calling "abusive" in its extravagance.

The order -- charged to government credit cards -- included more than $3,000 for drinks, more than $500 for shrimp cocktails and almost $900 for mini crab cakes, according to the Government Accountability Office, the investigate arm of Congress.

And then there's the steak.

Booyah: Dissecting Jim Cramer’s new contract…

Submitted by Dmitri Davydov on Thu, 2008-04-10 18:55.
Posted in:

Ever since (TSCM) issued this press release yesterday announcing that it had inked a new contract with Jim Cramer, there’s been no shortage of stories about the deal — most of which note the read more...

Small firm airs Wal-Mart's unguarded video moments

Submitted by Dmitri Davydov on Thu, 2008-04-10 10:04.
Posted in:

Wal-Mart's internal meetings are on display in three decades worth of videos made by a Kansas production company scrambling to stay in business after Wal-Mart stopped using the firm.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. dropped longtime contractor Flagler Productions in 2006. In response to losing its biggest customer, the small company has opened its archive, for a fee, to researchers who include plaintiffs' lawyers and union critics seeking clips of unguarded moments at the world's largest retailer.

Why Things Cost $19.95

Submitted by Dmitri Davydov on Wed, 2008-04-09 18:45.

Ever wondered why retailers price goods at $4.99 rather than $5.00? Here is the best scientific explanation I read:

Why Things Cost $19.95, by Wray Herbert, SciAm Mind Matters: ...[M]ost of us are motivated by the desire for a fair deal, and we employ some sophisticated cognitive tools to weigh offers, fashion responses, and so forth—all the to-and-fro in getting to an agreement.

Bank safety box termites eat up trader's life savings

Submitted by Dmitri Davydov on Tue, 2008-04-08 11:02.
Dwarika Prasad (Pic: Prashant Ravi)
Mr Prasad had saved up for his old age (Pictures: Prashant Ravi)

A trader in the Indian state of Bihar has lost his life savings after ter

School bans birthday cake

Submitted by Dmitri Davydov on Mon, 2008-04-07 09:37.
Posted in:

WELLINGTON (Reuters) - Children in a New Zealand school have been banned from bringing cakes to share on their birthdays, due to new government healthy eating guidelines.

Pupils at Oteha Valley primary school north of Auckland have been told they are allowed to celebrate their birthdays, but the cake must stay at home, the New Zealand Herald newspaper reported.

The Ministry of Education has been on a fat-busting crusade, introducing sweeping guidelines against unhealthy food in New Zealand schools.

Blogger Dies From Blogging Too Much. And No, It's Not A Joke.

Submitted by Dmitri Davydov on Sun, 2008-04-06 10:48.

SAN FRANCISCO — They work long hours, often to exhaustion. Many are paid by the piece — not garments, but blog posts. This is the digital-era sweatshop. You may know it by a different name: home.

A growing work force of home-office laborers and entrepreneurs, armed with computers and smartphones and wired to the hilt, are toiling under great physical and emotional stress created by the around-the-clock Internet economy that demands a constant stream of news and comment.


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